Johnathan.org

Brilliant

I am always on the hunt for new tools to aid in learning. As someone that didn’t excel very well in a traditional educational environment–I repeated my last year of high school and it took me a bit over eight years to manage to get my college degree–alternative environments are especially intriguing because fulfilling the consumption of knowledge requirement I keep for myself in a way that both makes the material interesting and easy to digest has been hard.

I discovered Brilliant a couple weeks ago and yesterday, and jumping to the end for just a moment, I committed to a year of their premium service. I wanted to briefly discuss why I found Brilliant so appealing and why I think it can be the next great learning platform.

Brilliant’s missing is simple:

Finding and developing the next generation of scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.

They believe that accessibility is paramount. Those who are well off or have more access to resources generally find themselves excelling. For those who may not have access to the same resources, while they’re entirely driven and have great potential, excelling in a field can be hard.

Brilliant recommended

The list of recommended courses by type.

When you first sign up for Brilliant, you can pick any number of topics. The easiest place to start is my skimming the Recommended section and see what catches your eye. You’ll find a whole host of different categories to choose from in math, science, and computer science. If your goal is to bolster your knowledge that could most likely help in your career (and that career is at least partially technology or math-based), the Recommended > Professionals section is the place to start.

After skimming the list I came to realize that I ultimately want to learn all of it and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that idea. But you have to start somewhere. Personally, I started with the Logic topic. It contains a few critical thinking questions that were actually exciting to solve and know the correct answer to, as well!

Brilliant course detail

Each course breaks down the material is easy to digest sections.

With your course selected, it makes the most sense to start at the beginning. Every course opens the intro topic to you for free so you can get a sense if the platform is going to work out for you and even if there are enough topics of interest to make the price worth it. You can skim through the list to see if it’s something you’d like to give into and if so, start with the first entry always! Each topic is broken down very logically and contain easy to digest questions and solutions that do a great job of explaining.

Brilliant question

The questions are simple and clutter-free.

Each question is presented on its own. Most questions are multiple choice with some requiring you to fill in the answer (though they often give you several chances in case you have a typo). If you’re not sure, guess!

If you find yourself stumped, you can view the solution and it’ll go into great detail about the question, the underlying topic, and provide examples. After reading the solution, if you understand it, make sure to hit the thumbs up button at the bottom. If not, hit the thumbs down button and explain why. Once you’re ready you can proceed to the next question.

As someone that has always been a visual learner, there were a few that I found difficult and definitely got wrong because I’m trying to convert words into something I can visualize which can be hard. It took a couple re-reads of the solution to fully get it, but there wasn’t a time when I didn’t understand the material. (In other words, the solutions often have visual aids to help explain the material).

Beyond all the knowledge you can learn, Brilliant takes things one step further and acts as a platform for students to be discovered. They cite a couple particularly interesting examples. Mursalin Habib is 16 years old and explained induction in great detail and in a way that make sense. Anastasiya Romanova started a calculus contest for fun.

Don’t think for a moment, though, that Brilliant is just for high school and college-aged people. There’s no age limit and whether you’re 16 or 60, you’ll find something to learn.

I strongly recommend this service to everyone. Brilliant does a great job of taking complex categories if knowledge and breaking them down into super bite sized chunks that build on each other and make learning them an actually satisfying experience. At $24.99/month, it’s a bit steep, but if you find yourself thinking that you’d see yourself using it for at least a few months, definitely go for the annual plan instead. At $119.88/year ($9.99/month), paying monthly would end up costing more at month 5 and beyond, though you definitely lose a bit of the flexibility. Given the amount of content, spend a couple hours a week and you’ll have enough to keep you busy for quite a while.

You can check out Brilliant here and get started with an absolutely free trial. If you stick around, you’ll also likely be presented with a 20% off discount on the annual plan that’s only good for 2 days. This makes the break even point occur during month 3, instead. For me that was a no-brainer. I can see myself sticking around for at least 4 months and I’m sure you will, too, with all sorts of awesome new knowledge gained in the process.

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Johnathan Lyman
Kenmore, WA,
United States
 
blogging, design, technology, software, development, gaming, photography