Johnathan.org

January 26, 2015

The Workforce in 2030

I recently caught a TED Talk by Rainer Strack on the shifting of the workforce in the few decades to come. There’s a fundamental change that’ll take place soon and one thing’s for sure, there’ll end up being a lot more vacancies in the job market than there are now. I’m sure you’re wondering:

[Conservative] How can this be? Isn’t the economy in the toilet, still?
[Progressive] How can this be? Isn’t the economy doing great already?

Well fear not pundit! Because neither really matter. See, it’s not about how the economy’s doing but who’s working. In the 50s, we had what you’d call a “boom.” It wasn’t an industrial boom, nor an oil boom. It was a baby boom. While it sounds all fine and dandy, the problem lies in what will happen when that sharp population growth that took place fifty and almost sixty years ago all of a sudden decides to retire. I’m sure you can figure out the rest.

On the Bus in the Fog Unlike a Dog on a Log in a Bog with Nog

This is the first time I’ve tried to write a post on the bus. There’s a lot of free time to be had on the bus, that I could just waste reading ArsTechnica articles or scrolling Facebook. But after my recap on the finicky relationship I have with my iPhone I feel like it’s necessary to look into putting it to better use.

First off, let me be clear. I don’t have any special writing apps to craft posts for when I’m in a bus in the fog writing for my blog (or any other alliterative, Dr. Seuss-type wordplays). I’m using the basic Notes app that comes with all Apple devices these days. I’m not even bothering to check my spelling too much as autocorrect seems to be doing a pretty good job on its own. Now granted if my word choice ends up being a total crapfest, then I feel like I need to go back and update it.

Along with the Notes app comes the WordPress app from Automattic. It’s how I interface with my site from both my iPhone and iPad.

Second, I don’t find it necessary to spend every waking moment writing, although it is enjoyable. I’m sure if I tried hard enough I could find enough stuff to talk about during the day to write non stop for two people.

Third, what’s a blog post anyway but a digital journal entry? All I’m doing is putting my thoughts on digital paper and sharing them. I understand the recourse of the idea that once it’s on the Internet it’s there forever.

At some point, someone will want to sit next to me and hopefully I’ll be close to the end. There’s nothing I hate more than someone peeking over my shoulder trying to see what I’m up to. I get passing glances and whatnot, stuff happens. I can’t expect someone to never catch a glance of my kickass high score in Candy Crush.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to clear my autocorrect dictionary after all the new crap words it seems to have recorded after I wrote this.

PS: I might have seemed a bit ramble. That’s just how I write and think on a moments notice. I wrote this post more so to prove a point that to myself that I can write wherever I am. In the future, I think I’ll have to procure one of those keyboard iPad cases. A small screen makes my thumbs hurt.

Taking Notes

Reflecting on my journey so far, one thing I’ve noticed that seems to be most consistent is my desire to write has improved, ten fold. Instead of coming up with huge elaborate stories or long-winded essays about something I don’t even know if I completely understand, I’m starting to keep my thoughts to under a thousand words. This keeps me from getting bored with what I write, and if I do choose to write something more long-form, I can do so without feeling like that’s all I do and it’s just more words on a page. I’m also finding that I’m wanting to take time out of my day, whenever it is, to “write something real quick.” Take last weekend, for example, I wrote a total of [x] posts and published them all. Were they all related? No, but they were all things I had going on in my head and I made sure to take the time to put them down and share them.

Going forward, I think this is something I’ll be doing more often. This has been a product of the changes in my morning routine now that I’m writing every day, almost without fail. So far I’ve had to resort to looking at my notes but a few times, but I can only speculate if that’ll get better or worse. I have at any one time, several different things I’m pondering or thinking about and am taking note of them on my iPhone with the built-in Notes app so when I get home in the evening or start spinning up first thing in the morning, I can look back on it and pick up where I left off. There’s no shame in checking notes to remember what you might want to talk about. I have complete faith that even the best of us do that, too.

If you have a lot of things you want to talk about but don’t ever remember them, writing them down when they pop into your head could save your bacon one day!

Positioning for the Journey to Dreamland

I saw a rather interesting article this morning via the Wall Street Journal that talks about finding the perfect sleep position. I couldn’t help but think: “is there some mad science in here that will give me the answer to all things sleeping so I can sleep mad sleeps and wake up feeling like a million dollars?” Well, no. The only way to wake up feeling like a stack of cash is either a) have a million dollars or b) eat some of those crazy mushrooms the kids like.

Anyway, This article had some good points that I wanted to recap because it’s something I struggle with from time to time, and after adjusting my morning routine to better serve my daily writing goals, the best sleep I can get from the limited time I have is fine by me.

Looking back on even last night’s sleep, I started out on my side, and the article puts me in the majority with 57% of sleepers starting out that way. Sometimes, if I’m already pretty relaxed, I’ll start on my back, and let my eyes literally roll back into my head (weird I know). That’s something only 17% of people seem to do, and for those stomach sleepers out there, you’re the odder of the bunch at 11% for starting positions.

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What I really found interesting is just in the next paragraph, the author talks about the variance in the amount of times people toss and turn during the night: as few as three times to as many as 36. I would have no way of knowing where I fall in that category unless I videotaped myself. I’m ok not knowing that much about my sleeping habits.

I whole-heartedly believe it’s important to make sure I am sleeping “properly” or as close to it as I can. I try to avoid pain areas in the sense that I’ll sleep on the opposite side if I’m favoring an area or if my back hurts, I’ll try to lay as flat as I can, to keep as much tension and pressure off it as possible.

If you have time—if you don’t, I think you should make time—go read the article form the Wall Street Journal. Sleep is important and making sure you’re getting the most out of it is crucial to morning success. Not all of us can just spring out of bed before the birds.

Hunting the Hunter: Trying to Take a Photo of my Cat

I tried something interesting, yesterday. Every once in a while, I find the urge to pull out my camera and shoot stuff at home. It doesn’t happen very often, and for good reason. My space is outside, where things don’t move, where all I have to worry about is what time the sun sets, and how cold my fingers will end up at the end. The outdoors is peaceful. Nature doesn’t have a schedule and it largely sticks around for as long as it deems necessary. There are great places to hike, camp, and smell the roses, if there are any.

Bringing it back into reality, however, my home isn’t anything like that.

Have you ever tried taking a photo of you cat?

I did, and it wasn’t easy. It took a bit of thinking, stealth maneuvering, and patience. See, cats are these interesting creatures that do whatever the heck they want, when they want. They’re the part of nature that waits for no one, and if you miss out, that sucks for you. It’s interesting to see the juxtaposition of an animal that’s an extension of our larger feline friends in the wild, so free-spirited, and they end up pooping in some baking-soda-covered clay chunks, and they’re totally ok with it.

Maybe your cat’s chill. Good for you. Maybe you don’t own a cat and think I’m totally whack even talking about it, not long after talking about my cat being in a box. You might be wondering if I’ve run out of ideas of things to write about. All of those thoughts are valid and I understand your concern. I’m not crazy, though. Never the crazy cat person, will I be.

Oh, and you might be wondering if I ever got that photo?

No.

Cat 1. Human 0.

Johnathan Lyman
Kenmore, WA,
United States
 
blogging, design, technology, software, development, gaming, photography